The Hawaiʻi Partnership for Climate-Smart Commodities

The Hawaiʻi Climate-Smart Partnership

Measuring the impact of climate-smart practices in Hawaiʻi

Climate-Smart Hawaiʻi

Human practices affecting ʻāina

Increased Carbon Sequestration

Certain practices affect carbon inputs into the soil and the duration for which the soil retains that carbon. Much of the research to understand these effects has focused on temperate mainland systems. In this project, we will investigate Hawai’i-specific practices on Hawai’i-specific soils, which require new approaches to data analysis compared to those designed for mainland systems.

Increased carbon in soil means less carbon in the atmosphere and a reduction in carbon dioxide levels, helping to mitigate global warming. The benefits of enhanced carbon sequestration extend beyond our island boundaries.

ʻĀina affecting human resilience

More Soil Carbon and Connected Practices

Caring for ‘āina also means caring for our human communities. By implementing climate-smart strategies, we expect to see a wealth of co-benefits for our communities, including improved water quality, more fertile soils, better crop yields, revitalized cultural practices, and additional benefits yet to be identified. In this project, we will develop a holistic framework tailored to Hawai‘i’s specific context to support the decision-making of both land managers and policymakers.

Placing Hawaiʻi soils in temperate contexts

Predicting soils in Hawaiʻi

Caring for ‘āina also means caring for our human communities. By implementing climate-smart strategies, we expect to see a wealth of co-benefits for our communities, including improved water quality, more fertile soils, better crop yields, revitalized cultural practices, and additional benefits yet to be identified. In this project, we will develop a holistic framework tailored to Hawai‘i’s specific context to support the decision-making of both land managers and policymakers.